Alabama

Birmingham Watch

  • BirminghamWatch Recommends

    Alabama Prison Deaths Continue in 2023; Three Dead This Weekend (Montgomery Advertiser)‘Election Shenanigans’: Winners and Losers Question Legitimacy of Birmingham’s Neighborhood Elections (CBS 42)Early Poll: DeSantis Beating Trump Among Alabama Republicans (Alabama Daily News)Alabama’s Permitless Carry Law Stirs Questions, Concerns Among Law Enforcement, Gun Rights Group (AL.com)Birmingham Radio Legend Shelley Stewart, 88, Cements His Place in History (Birmingham Times) The post BirminghamWatch Recommends appeared first on BirminghamWatch.

  • Hoover City Schools canceled Derrick Barnes’ visit. He says it’s political.

    Hoover school officials say they canceled the Black children's book author's visit due to a controversial social media post. Officials never saw the post after an anonymous parent reported it. Read more. The post Hoover City Schools canceled Derrick Barnes’ visit. He says it’s political. appeared first on BirminghamWatch.

  • This Swampy Paradise is Alabama’s Winter Haven for Sandhill Cranes

    As many as 25,000 sandhill cranes migrate to Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge every winter, along with a handful of highly endangered whooping cranes. Read more. The post This Swampy Paradise is Alabama’s Winter Haven for Sandhill Cranes appeared first on BirminghamWatch.

  • Pay Raises, Recreation Areas Provided Under Woodfin’s Budget Surplus Plan

    The Birmingham City Council voted Tuesday to unanimously approve Mayor Randall Woodfin’s plans for spending the city’s $81 million budget surplus, with money allocated to a cost-of-living adjustment for city employees, capital improvement for parks and libraries, and funding for a new amphitheater in the city’s Uptown entertainment district. Read more. The post Pay Raises, Recreation Areas Provided Under Woodfin’s Budget Surplus Plan appeared first on BirminghamWatch.

  • New Book Explores Stories of Early African American Activists in Birmingham

    Segregation in the New South: Birmingham, Alabama, 1871-1901 (Louisiana State University Press, 2023) by Carl V. Harris Birmingham is known around the world as a place where African Americans fought and sometimes died to secure their rights as citizens and dismantle Jim Crown segregation. But Jim Crow did not spring up fully formed, nor was it a system that had always existed. It was the product of a long and tortuous push and pull between blacks seeking justice and whites seeking control. At its birth in 1871, Birmingham was a Reconstruction-era city, and Birmingham came of age in a time when white Southerners and African American Southerners, many only a few years removed from enslavement, were struggling to find their places in a new post-war racial order. This is the story, and the stories of early African American activists who are largely unknown today, that Carl V. Harris tells in his new book Segregation in the New South: Birmingham, Alabama, 1871-1901. Harris, who taught history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, died before completing this book. His colleague, W. Elliott Brownlee, edited and finished the manuscript. Harris’ earlier book, Political Power in Birmingham, 1871-1921 (University of Tennessee Press, 1977), was the first scholarly book on Birmingham’s history and it is still indispensable for anyone wanting to understand the political dynamics of Birmingham’s early decades. Read more. The post New Book Explores Stories of Early African American Activists in Birmingham appeared first on BirminghamWatch.

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